Posts for: March, 2018

DentalCareisDifficultbutnotImpossibleforaSpecialNeedsChild

A child with a chronic illness or condition often requires a lot of focus on care for their special needs. Other aspects of their health can often take a back seat — too often including dental care.

Proper dental care can be a challenge for special needs children if they have diminished physical, intellectual or behavioral capacities. Children with autism or attention deficit disorders may not be able or willing to perform tasks like brushing and flossing. Other conditions could make them intolerant to toothpaste in the mouth, or create an inability to keep their mouths open or to spit.

Some chronic conditions also seem predisposed to dental defects. For example, enamel hypoplasia, a lack of sufficient tooth enamel, is common with Down, Treacher-Collins or Turner Syndromes, and can greatly increase the risk of tooth decay.

But even though difficult, effective dental care isn't impossible. It begins with your dental provider.

Pediatric dentists are often excellent in this regard: they often have the training and experience to treat children with chronic conditions. Whoever you choose must be able to partner with you in caring for your child's dental needs.

Daily hygiene is also a critical factor. Your goal should be the same as with any child — to teach them to brush and floss for themselves. Depending on their condition, however, you may need to assist them for a longer term, perhaps permanently. But it is imperative — daily hygiene is their best defense against oral diseases.

You should also consider their medication and how it may impact their dental health. Antidepressants, antihistamines or drugs that assist with breathing function can cause mouth dryness. This, as well as drugs with sugar or acid compounds, can increase risk for dental disease. If they must take these types of medications, try to give them at mealtime to reduce their effect in the mouth.

Above all, pursue the same professional dental care as you would for any other child. Keep up regular dental visits beginning around their first birthday for cleanings and preventive measures like topical fluoride or sealants. By taking these measures you'll help ensure their dental health won't suffer.

If you would like more information on dental care for special needs children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Managing Tooth Decay in Children with Chronic Diseases.”


By Brookside Dental Care
March 23, 2018
Category: Oral Health

Like any phobia, fear of going to the dentist can range from mild to crippling depending on the person and their personal levels of anxiety. sedation dentistryIn addition to causing a great deal of stress, dental phobia can interfere with getting essential preventive care and treatment, putting your oral health at risk. Whether you need to have a cavity filled or require dental surgery, sedation dentistry can help you get the dental care you need in a calm and comfortable setting. The dentists at Brookside Dental Care in Stockton, CA, offer several types of sedation for every situation.

Sedation Dentistry in Stockton, CA

Dental phobias come in all shapes and sizes. Some people are afraid of needles, others panic at the mere sight of the dentist, while some may feel the most anxious while sitting in the waiting room anticipating their procedure. Sedation dentistry provides relief from any discomfort associated with your procedure, as well as peace of mind before and during treatment.

Types of Sedation Dentistry

There are three types of sedation available at Brookside Dental Care:

  • Oral
  • Nitrous oxide (laughing gas)
  • Intravenous (IV)

In addition to helping you to relax and manage your fear and anxiety about getting dental work, mild to moderate sedation can make it easier for your dentist to work on your teeth and gums, which can ultimately yield better results and possibly get you out of the dentist's chair faster. A relaxed and sedated patient will not tense up, clench their jaw, or flinch as the dentist is trying to work. Taking advantage of sedation dentistry to keep up with your oral health is a great way to protect your smile and prevent the risk of needing more extensive dental work in the future as a result of skipping regular dental care due to fear and anxiety.

Find a Sedation Dentist in Stockton, CA

Don't let stress, fear or anxiety interfere with your oral health and getting the dental care that you need. For more information about sedation dentistry services, contact our office by calling (209) 952-8804 to schedule an appointment with a dentist today.


By Brookside Dental Care
March 13, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: fluoride  
3FluorideSourcesYouShouldMonitorforYourFamilysDentalHealth

Fluoride is an important weapon in the fight against tooth decay. Fluoride consumption and other applications are especially beneficial during children's dental development for building strong teeth long-term.

But the truism "too much of a good thing" could aptly apply to fluoride. If a child consumes too much fluoride over an extended period of time, it could cause a condition called enamel fluorosis in which the enamel surface develops mottled or streaked staining. It's not harmful to the tooth's health, but it can greatly diminish a person's smile appearance.

To avoid fluorosis, it's important with the help of your dentist to know and regulate as much as possible the amount of fluoride your child receives. Here are 3 fluoride sources you should manage.

Toothpaste. Many manufacturers add fluoride to their toothpaste formula, usually an important way to receive this tooth-strengthening chemical. But younger children tend to swallow more toothpaste than older children or adults. Because the chemical builds up in the body over time, swallowing toothpaste every day could potentially elevate your child's fluoride levels. To avoid this, just use a "smear" of toothpaste on the brush for children under age 2, and a pea-sized amount for older children.

Your water system. About three-quarters of all public water utilities add fluoride to their water as an added measure for tooth decay prevention. The amount can vary from system to system, although the maximum amount recommended by the U.S. Government is 0.70 parts per million (PPM). You can ask your local water system how much fluoride, if any, is present or they add to your drinking water.

Bottled water. Any type of bottled beverage (water, juices, sodas, etc.) could contain various levels of fluoride. Unfortunately there are no labeling requirements regarding its presence, so the most prudent course is to carefully manage the beverages your child drinks, or stay with bottled water marked "de-ionized," "purified," "demineralized" or "distilled," which typically have lower fluoride levels. For babies feeding on milk, you can use the aforementioned bottled waters to mix powder, use ready-to-feed formula (also low in fluoride) or breast-feed.

If you would like more information on fluoride and your baby, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Development and Infant Formula.”